Jim Inhofe

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The axe is about to fall in Washington DC, and as tomorrow’s budget sequester rapidly approaches, many Senators are looking for agreement on a way to soften its impact. Laura Litvan and Brian Faler of Bloomberg report:

Senator James Inhofe of Oklahoma will introduce this week a measure that would let military service chiefs move around funds within the Pentagon’s budget this fiscal year, according to his spokeswoman, Donelle Harder.

Beginning March 1, the government faces $85 billion in across-the-board cuts over seven months — half of it from defense — unless President Barack Obama and Congress agree on an alternative.

“It buys time for a better fix” for the cuts, Harder said of Inhofe’s proposal. Lawmakers in his party are seeking an elusive consensus on how to deal with the reductions, known as sequestration.

Inhofe’s measure, to be co-sponsored by Senator Pat Toomey, a Pennsylvania Republican, also would provide flexibility this fiscal year to domestic agencies facing cuts.
Inhofe’s proposal faces opposition from Republicans on the defense panel, including Senator John McCain of Arizona and Senator Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire. They back an alternative introduced by Ayotte that would delay sequestration for one year by requiring a 10 percent reduction in federal personnel through attrition and a pay freeze for lawmakers.

With Inhofe in the news this week, I decided to look at some of his major campaign contributors using OpenSecrets.org.

Inhofe’s top donor was Koch Industries, the Kansas multinational with interests in petroleum, chemical, fiber, finance and many other areas. Run by the billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch, the corporation has poured billions into fighting the regulation of energy and financial derivatives; they’ve contributed nearly $100,000 to Inhofe. Likewise Murray Energy (second), a coal mining corporation run by Robert E. Murray, lobbies frequently against mining regulations; it has contributed $66,000 to global warming denier Inhofe. Inhofe has also received numerous donations from oil and gas companies such as ConocoPhillips (11th), Oklahoma City’s Devon Energy (16th), and Chevron (19th); as well as fossil fuel users like the United Parcel Service (fifth), the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (15th), the National Automobile Dealers Association (17th), and railroaders Union Pacific (20th).

Inhofe, a licensed commercial pilot who’s had run-ins with the Federal Aviation Administration, had funds dropped into his campaign from the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (third) and Fort Worth, Texas, based American Airlines (fourth).

The Senator gets funds from several professional trade associations: the National Association of Realtors (sixth); the American Medical Association (eighth); the Associated General Contractors of America (12th); the National Beer Wholesalers Association (13th); and the American Bankers Association (18th).

Rounding out his top-twenty list are the National Rifle Association (seventh); telecom multinational AT&T (ninth); a business called Golden Rule Financial (tenth); and military and aerospace contractor Lockheed Martin (14th).

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